ON Nature Autumn 2004





ON_Nature_Autumn_2004_banner_2DEPARTMENTS
5 | This Issue A FINE BALANCE
Is there a meeting ground between environmentalists and the aggregate industry? By Victoria Foote

7 | In the Mail ENVIRONMENTAL REFUSNIKS

8 | Earthwatch
Mining along Lake Superior’s shoreline; new chemical compounds found in gull eggs; an energy boost for Ontario

15 | Profile MAN WITH A PLAN
Superintendant Robin Reilly wants Quetico Park to be more than a remote paddling destination By Bruce Gillespie

36 | Urban Nature BIRDING IN THE BIG CITY
Find out when and where to go birding during the spectacular fall migration By Ted Cheskey

38 | Field Trip BEETLES IN ONTARIO By Dan Schneider

44 | Inside Ontario Nature
Ontario Nature awards Frank Pope; green heroes celebrated at AGM; money raised for Smart Growth program

46 | Last Word COME ON IN
True, we have lots of parks in Ontario. But did you know that they can be logged, mined and paved? By Even Ferrari and Jim Faught

FEATURES
18 | 9,500 HOLES AND COUNTING
Pits and quarries pockmark our landscape, often in some of the province’s most sensitive habitats. Urban sprawl fuels the aggregate industry and the industry underpins urban sprawl. Where does it all end? By Ray Ford

24 | LAST STAND
Little is left of southern Ontario’s grand old forests thanks to development, roads and large-scale agriculture. The provincial government must adopt a Greenway Strategy aimed at protecting our forests and keeping urban borders firm – before its too late By Helena Rusak

29 | NOTES FROM FRONTENAC PARK
Sometimes, explains a dedicated soloist, nature is best experienced one-on-one By Chris Higgins

32 | THE HOT SHOTS
The winners of the annual photo contest

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