Natural Wonders

Natural Wonders

Ontario nature and the Bruce Trail Conservancy team up to save one of our most significant natural wonders.
By Allan Britnell

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Creatures of the night

Creatures of the night

Wind turbines and disease are taking a toll on bat populations here and south of the border. Can a combination of innovative solutions bring these nocturnal mammals back from the brink?
By Tim Tiner

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Kirtland’s warbler

Kirtland’s warbler

  First identified less than two centuries ago, North America’s rarest warbler makes an impressive comeback.  By Tim Tiner   Among species at risk, North America’s rarest warbler provides one of the few good-news stories. Brought back from the brink of extinction on its tiny Michigan breeding range, the tame, effusive, tail-bobbing Kirtland’s warbler has […]

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Building bridges

Building bridges

I am writing in response to the Earth Watch article “Bridging over controversy” [Spring 2010, page 9]. As Canadian lead of the Detroit River International Crossing (DRIC) study and a longtime supporter of Ontario Nature, I want to assure your readers that protection of the natural environment was key throughout the DRIC study. The natural […]

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Why we must protect Malcolm Bluff Shores

Why we must protect Malcolm Bluff Shores

By Caroline Schultz Those of you who work so diligently to defend this province’s rich natural heritage will understand that the acquisition over the next two years of a 423-hectare swath of the Bruce Peninsula known as Malcolm Bluff Shores is a very big deal. How big? Consider this: For an average hiker, it would […]

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Wind wars

Wind wars

How we can live with turbines without wrecking the wilderness. By Anne Bell Illustration by Marco Cibola   Nature conservationists and green-energy advocates, so often allies in the battle to preserve the natural world, are finding themselves in opposition to each other on an increasingly important issue: the spread of wind farms across the province […]

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Oasis of nature deserves new status

Oasis of nature deserves new status

By Caroline Schultz Rouge Park, North America’s largest urban park and a sanctuary for plants, animals and people, may become a national park if Ontario Nature and other groups have their say. That designation would confer greater protection on this oasis of nature located at the east end of Toronto.

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A magical tour

A magical tour

Our Donors Champions for Nature Next to a sparkling Georgian Bay shoreline, under clear blue skies, Ontario Nature’s executive director, Caroline Schultz, and president of the board Brendon Larson led a group of our most loyal and generous donors belonging to Ontario Nature’s Champions of Nature program, as well as staff, on a tour of […]

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The big spill

The big spill

By Douglas Hunter As the Deepwater Horizon oil rig disaster in the Gulf of Mexico continued to unfold throughout the summer, Canadian scientists began considering the consequences of this unprecedented environmental disaster on the bird species that depend on the gulf region as a major winter stopover and migratory pathway.

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The road to recovery

The road to recovery

By Amber Cowie Life in the fast lane is hazardous for all species, but navigating southern Ontario’s dense network of roads takes an especially high toll on small animals, such as turtles, snakes and salamanders. Aware of the danger cars pose to the rare Jefferson salamander, the City of Burlington recently adopted an enlightened approach to […]

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Rosemary Speirs: Standing up for nature

Rosemary Speirs: Standing up for nature

—As told to John Hassell I have been involved with many Ontario Nature campaigns during my 10 years on the organization’s board of directors. Looking back, I’m proud of the milestones that we have reached along the way. When the mayor of Pickering openly flouted conservation easements by selling 1,600 hectares of land to developers, […]

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The Ring of Fire

The Ring of Fire

Mining activity continues to escalate in a part of our province that the government claimed would be a candidate for conservation. Will the Ring of Fire become Ontario’s tar sands?
By Peter Gorrie

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The race to save the South March Highlands

The race to save the South March Highlands

Road construction and development threaten a unique and biologically diverse forest-wetland complex – unless a coalition of concerned citizens can slam on the brakes in time.
By Brian Banks

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Ontario Nature’s Writing and Art Contest for Youth

Ontario Nature’s Writing and Art Contest for Youth

This year, we asked kids to submit artwork in addition to essays. The winners wowed us with their responses to our topic: “Wild species and wild spaces: why biodiversity is important to me.”

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Autumn 2010

Autumn 2010

The importance of nature reserves. By Caroline Schultz Ontario Nature’s ambitious campaign to conserve important habitat; going national with Rouge Park; the BP oil spill and Ontario’s birds. First identified less than two centuries ago, our rarest warbler makes a comeback. By Tim Tiner Donor spotlight: our Champions of Nature go on a magical tour. […]

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One of-a-kind protection

One of-a-kind protection

By Sharon Oosthoek Walpole Island First Nation has a long history of taking care of the rare ecosystems that make up its six delta islands at the head of Lake St. Clair. Now a group of residents is building on that history with the creation of the first Aboriginal land trust in Canada to receive charitable […]

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