Summer 2008

Summer 2008

One more species at risk by Victoria Foote Guelph gets a park for pollinators; reptiles at risk; saving Lake Simcoe; Phil Cotton: putting conservation on the map How to turn your garden into an ecological oasis for winged jewels by Moira Farr Mischievous marvels by Dan Schneider and Peter Pautler Friends of ON Nature; the […]

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Some tough love

Some tough love

Environmentalists are fed up with ATV drivers declaring their passion for nature by trampling it with four-wheeled machines by Edward Keenan Any all-terrain vehicle (ATV) enthusiast will tell you that off-road riders just love nature. One Ontario “ATV Adventure” website I visited recently, for example, pitched “quad” riding as a way to “view the Canadian […]

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Friends of nature

Friends of nature

As a boy, Howard Phillips spent his summers beneath the pine and birch trees that surrounded Trout Lake at his grandparents’ Sudbury cottage, collecting driftwood, picking blueberries and poring over nature guides in his uncle’s bookshop. These carefree months away from the bustling Toronto neighbourhood he grew up in helped form Phillips’s appreciation for the […]

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Squirrels

Squirrels

by Dan Schneider and Peter Pautler Fight or flight As a prey species, squirrels must be constantly vigilant. Leaping from tree to tree is one escape technique for tree squirrels, an ability most evident in flying squirrels. Relative to their body size flying squirrels have the longest legs of all our squirrels, allowing them to […]

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The butterfly effect

The butterfly effect

Gardening for these jewel-like pollinators is about more than just flowers by  Moira Farr When I bought a home in Cobourg (a little more than an hour’s drive east of Toronto, on Lake Ontario) two years ago, I inherited a garden that had been lovingly tended by a gifted gardener. As a novice, I have […]

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Roads to ruin

Roads to ruin

The province is poised to build a highway that will arc across the Niagara Peninsula, threatening farm lands, headwaters, wetlands and wildlife with car-oriented sprawl. Now a determined coalition of conservation and citizens groups is fighting back, demanding that the government honour its pledges to combat the causes of climate change by Tim Tiner Environmental […]

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The dark side of light

The dark side of light

As our cities grow (and grow), people must travel further afield to gaze upon a starry sky. But this is more than an inconvenience. New research reveals how light pollution hurts plants, animals and even human health by Shannon Wilmot On a clear night on Ontario’s Manitoulin Island, you can crane your head back and […]

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The greatest lake

The greatest lake

When 10,000 square kilometers of Lake Superior became Canada’s first national marine conservation area, environmentalists and paddlers cheered. But with all the fine print buried in its new status, the world’s largest protected freshwater area remains far more vulnerable than most people realize by Conor Mihell When the hot, late-afternoon sun beats down on Bowman […]

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My Turn: Phil Cotton

My Turn: Phil Cotton

Putting conservation on the map As told to Conor Mihell People call me Uncle Phil. It’s a term of endearment I’ve come to appreciate after four summers of canoeing, portaging and camping with 91 new-found friends in Wabakimi Provincial Park, Ontario’s largest expanse of protected boreal forest.

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Trial and error

Trial and error

By Conor Mihell The legalities surrounding cross-border pollution have always been murky, but legal clarity may be forthcoming as a result of a case now before the courts in Sarnia. The Ontario Superior Court of Justice summoned a Michigan-based energy company to face charges for contaminating the St. Clair River, which flows along the international […]

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Saving Lake Simcoe

Saving Lake Simcoe

By Jim MacInnis “A healthy Lake Simcoe,” says Caroline Schultz, executive director of Ontario Nature, “depends on a healthy watershed. This means comprehensive land-use planning that sets and sticks to clear targets for protecting key agricultural areas and a natural heritage system of woodlands and wetlands.”

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Climate watch

Climate watch

By Douglas Hunter A team of U.S. and U.K. scientists has warned that climate change could place unique Antarctic marine life in jeopardy because of predacious invaders. “Sharks are going to arrive in Antarctica as long as the warming trend continues, a bit more slowly than crabs.

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Water removal

Water removal

By Jim MacInnis Why, in a province that contains one-third of the fresh water on earth, readily available through municipal and nonmunicipal tap water supplies, do Ontarians drink so much bottled water?

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SOS for endangered reptiles

SOS for endangered reptiles

By Mark Carabetta More than half of Ontario’s reptile species – 15 of 24 – are listed as at risk both provincially and nationally. That so many of our turtles and snakes, as well as Ontario’s only lizard (the five-lined skink), are in jeopardy is especially troubling given that Ontario is home to more reptile […]

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Ohio turns green

Ohio turns green

By Douglas Hunter Notorious for dirty power plants that fill Ontario’s skies with acid rain, smog and greenhouse gases, the state of Ohio is finally poised to take a great leap forward in switching to green energy.

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A place for pollinators

A place for pollinators

By Kate Harries They may be a lowly pest for some, but insects are in fact a vital link in the web of life. Hundreds of species of bees, wasps, moths, beetles, butterflies and flies have suffered population declines as a result of habitat loss and the widespread use of pesticides, fertilizers and other types […]

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The trees are alright

The trees are alright

For the most part, the article “What the woods taught me” by Cecily Ross [Winter 2007/2008] about the writer’s experiences logging her treasured woodlot was well written. She concluded that a forestry consultant should be hired to mark trees for harvesting to protect the interests of landowners and their woodlots. Why not ask the question, […]

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The Canada Warbler

The Canada Warbler

By Victoria Foote The Canada warbler is a small, brightly coloured songbird that, like millions of other migratory birds, breeds in Canada’s vast boreal forest, including the portion of it that is in Ontario. It is sometimes referred to as the “necklaced warbler” because of the distinctive black markings across its yellow throat and breast. […]

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