Did you know?

Did you know?

Most eggs sold in Canada are “cage eggs” – produced by hens kept in wire cages that are stacked one on top of the other. Determining which eggs were laid by happy hens is difficult, and labels can be misleading. “Fresh” or “farm-fresh” are labels that mean virtually nothing. Farm-fresh eggs could very well have […]

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Last of the Caribou

Last of the Caribou

We are witnessing the disappearance of one of our most iconic inhabitants of the boreal forest, a species some describe as the “grey ghosts”: if industry and logging continue to carve into the forest, Ontario’s woodland caribou may be gone by the end of the century by Ray Ford Tugging on his toque and mitts […]

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The Mussel Crisis

The Mussel Crisis

Shockingly, more than half of North America’s freshwater mussels are in danger of going extinct. With the clock ticking, a small band of committed researchers is determined to save a group of molluscs that is critical to the health of our aquatic ecosystems by Moira Farr Spread across biologist Todd Morris’s palm is a cluster […]

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Seeds of Hope

Seeds of Hope

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by Allan Britnell

Seed bank: a secure repository for storing seeds. But a seed bank is so much more than this. These sorts of repositories are critical to the conservation and preservation of the genetic diversity of plant life. While humans have been collecting and preserving treasured seeds for millennia, only recently have efforts have been made to archive the world’s flora to safeguard stocks from possible extirpation due to disease, drought and other natural disasters.

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The First 10

The First 10

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These high-priority species will be fast-tracked for protection using new regulations that will set the provincial standard for endangered wildlife conservation

by Tim Tiner

In May 2007, Ontario Nature’s efforts, made in concert with other conservation groups as part of the Save Ontario’s Species coalition, were rewarded by a hard-won piece of legislation: a new Endangered Species Act (ESA).

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The Way of the Lizard

The Way of the Lizard

This is the article image. It can be linked to a larger image and resized if they need it to.

And the massasauga and the wood turtle, along with most of our reptile populations, which are now in rapid decline due to habitat loss, roads, poaching (turtles) and even senseless killing (snakes). Can we bring these cold-blooded creatures back from the brink?

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This issue

This issue

The decline of biodiversity by Caroline Schultz For wildlife, it is triage, pure and simple. When a scientific body declares that a species is “endangered,” the label alerts society and inspires reactive critical care. The practice is necessary if we are to save our most vulnerable species, but it is costly and would be less […]

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Message Board

Message Board

Wheels of progress As was illustrated in Edward Keenan’s “Some tough love” [Summer 2008], ATVs are a controversial topic. As landowners of a 2,100-hectare forest on the Oak Ridges Moraine, it goes without saying that we are very aware of them. I would like to take this opportunity to provide an update on the work […]

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My Turn – Joe Crowley: snake charmer

My Turn – Joe Crowley: snake charmer

As told to Victoria Foote I started working for Ontario Nature in April of this year when I was hired through the Metcalf Foundation internship program to oversee the Reptiles-At-Risk project. I spent the summer surveying six of Ontario Nature’s reserves and the surrounding area looking for at-risk reptiles and trying to determine the extent […]

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Follow that bug

Follow that bug

For medicine hunters, bugs mark the spot. Research by a joint team of scientists from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama, McGill University and the University of Toronto has shown that the vivid colours of certain poisonous insects, which causes predators to avoid them, is also a relatively reliable indicator of medicinal compounds […]

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Lake trash

Lake trash

In September, the U.S. Congress revised and ultimately upheld a policy that will continue to allow freighters to dump traces of cargo such as iron ore, wood chips and limestone (a process called “cargo sweeping”) into the Great Lakes.

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Saving Second Marsh – again

Saving Second Marsh – again

The proposed construction of a 12-hectare ethanol plant next to the largest remaining urban wetland in the Greater Toronto Area has Oshawa residents fuming.

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Dump Debacle

Dump Debacle

In one of the province’s longest running environmental battles, activists and residents of Tiny Township are waging a last-ditch effort to stop a municipal landfill from being dug on top of an aquifer described as one of the purest sources of water on earth.

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Storage Space

Storage Space

Did you know that the amount of energy from the sun shining down on earth for one hour is equivalent to the amount of energy used globally for an entire year? The harnessing of solar energy is not new. However, scientists have struggled to find a way to store solar energy for use when the […]

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Predators at Pearson

Predators at Pearson

For nearly a decade, Toronto’s Lester B. Pearson International Airport has been using birds of prey as part of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority’s (GTAA) wildlife control program, one of the largest of its kind in North America. The birds, including gyrfalcons and nationally threatened peregrine falcons, deter other birds that all too often collide […]

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Canada warbler

Canada warbler

Although not yet listed as an at-risk species in Ontario, the country’s namesake warbler is one of the continent’s fastest dwindling migratory songbirds by Tim Tiner It is a painful irony that one of the newest additions to Canadas list of species at risk is the countrys namesake warbler. A prolonged slide in population has […]

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Our Clubs: Kids for Turtles

Our Clubs: Kids for Turtles

It all started in May 2006, when twelve-year-old Sydney Tanzola grew alarmed by the dead turtles she found on her street and other roadways around Washago, Ontario.

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How to start a fire

How to start a fire

Farming communities are fanning the flames of a new environmental movement that protects both farmers and habitat by Bryan Gilvesy For nearly 30 years, my wife Cathy and I rushed out to our woodlot in an attempt to outrace the squirrels. We had, on our farm, one of the last remaining mature American chestnut trees, […]

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