Eastern Wood-pewee

eastern wood-pewee, Credit: Kelly Colgan-Azar CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Special Concern Nationally

Description

• Small forest bird, up to 15 centimetres long
• Greyish-olive upper parts; pale on under parts; pale wing bars
• Distinctive three-part song: “pee-ah-wee”
• Eats insects

Range

• In Canada, ranges from Saskatchewan to Nova Scotia
• Mostly found in southern and central Ontario, and as far north as Red Lake, Lake Nipigon and Timmins

Threats

• Habitat loss and degradation
• Decline in insect prey

Protection

• Federally protected under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994
• Not protected under the Endangered Species Act, 2007 or under the Species at Risk Act, 2002

Fact

From 1970 to 2011, the Breeding Bird Survey showed a decline of over 70 percent for eastern wood-pewee in Canada, with a 25 percent decline between 2001 and 2011.

eastern wood-pewee, Credit: Glen Peterson CC BY-NC 2.0

6 Comments

No Pings Yet

  1. November 6, 2015    

    […] Eastern Wood-pewee (Contopus virens) […]

  2. November 18, 2015    

    […] Eastern Wood-pewee (Contopus virens) […]

  3. David T Kalbach David T Kalbach
    June 13, 2017    

    The pictured bird is an Olive-sided Flycatcher

  4. June 13, 2017    

    Hi David,

    Thanks very much for spotting this easy-to-miss oversight. Olive-sided flycatchers have more rounded beaks, and more grey wingbars than the eastern wood-pewee. The Eastern wood-pewee also has a bright eye-ring, bright wingbars and a more pointed beak than the olive-sided flycatcher.

    We will correct the photos today.

    Best,

    ON Noah

  5. Margo Phair Margo Phair
    October 9, 2017    

    I have a flycatcher in a moss nest on my window sill it has not left yet ?? It come back to the nest every night , Is this unusual ?? Shouldnt it be gone by now for the winter ?

  6. October 10, 2017    

    Hi Margo,

    This is somewhat unusual. This year, as a result of warmer temperatures, some birds including warblers and some flycatchers delayed their migration and are now heading south to overwinter in warmer climates.

    ON Noah

  1. Species At Risk In Northern Ontario | on November 6, 2015 at 9:39 pm
  2. Birds – Northern Species At Risk | on November 18, 2015 at 9:39 pm

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Stay in touch with nature