Posts tagged Conor Mihell

Eating the forest

Eating the forest

Inspired by Conor Mihell’s article, “The Bountiful Forest” I found a recipe book entitled “The Edible Wild” by Berndt Berglund and Clare E. Bolsby in Ontario Nature’s library. The Edible Wild is both a cookbook and guide to wild plants that you can eat and cook with and which can be found throughout North America, including Ontario and […]

Read More

The scent of a turtle

The scent of a turtle

Scientists turn to man’s best friend to help recovery efforts for one of our most endangered species. By Conor Mihell






Read More

The renegade

The renegade

Unabashed tree lover Diana Beresford-Kroeger declares that forests hold the key to combating climate change and curing a multitude of ailments including cancer. By Conor Mihell






Read More

The Problem with Landfills

The Problem with Landfills

Tuesday, December 14, 2010 By Conor Mihell That the majority of Ontarians don’t have a clue where their garbage ends up after its left at the curb has as much to do with society’s general lack of environmental consciousness as it does the province’s lacklustre waste management regulations. Almost six million tonnes of Ontario waste […]

Read More

Frontier conservation

Frontier conservation

Northern Connections, Ontario Nature’s new program, brings isolated communities together to create a unique environmental voice that speaks for the big boreal landscape.
By Conor Mihell






Read More

Big lake warming

Big lake warming

Friday, August 13, 2010 By Conor Mihell In April, Minnesota-based naturalists Kate Crowley and Mike Link began a five-month, 2,575-kilometre walk around Lake Superior. Their goal: to capture an ecological snapshot of the lake’s perimeter in 2010—“baseline” information that will no doubt be a valuable tool in measuring changes over time. To achieve their goal, the […]

Read More

At your service

At your service

Can you put a price tag on the ecological functions – water filtration, clean air – provided by the good earth? Making the business case for nature.
By Conor Mihell






Read More

Back on track

Back on track

By Conor Mihell Wednesday, May 12, 2010 A 300-kilometre-long rail line linking the northern Ontario cities of Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie was raised from the dead when provincial and federal budgets in late March promised $30 million for long-needed track upgrades. While the antiquated Huron Central Railway is currently only used for transporting freight, rail activists in […]

Read More

Development crushes turtles

Development crushes turtles

Tuesday, March 30, 2010 By Conor Mihell The city of Ottawa is pushing through the completion of a four-kilometre extension of Terry Fox Drive to access areas for new housing developments. If roadwork is finished within a year, $32 million of the $47 million project will be paid for by provincial and federal stimulus funds. […]

Read More

Why fear the bear?

Why fear the bear?

Myth and misinformation have sullied the bruin’s reputation. In truth, the big mammal evolved as a prey species that learned to survive through caution and stealth By Conor Mihell






Read More

Finally: less logging in Algonquin

Finally: less logging in Algonquin

  Wednesday, February 3, 2010 Posted By Conor Mihell The ink is nearly dry on a new forest management plan for Algonquin Provincial Park that will increase the amount of logging-free area in Ontario’s most popular park. In November, the Algonquin Forestry Authority, the Crown consortium responsible for managing and planning logging activities within park boundaries, […]

Read More

Protecting an Island Paradise

Protecting an Island Paradise

Thursday December 17, 2009 Posted by Conor Mihell The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) has brokered the largest conservation deal in Ontario history by raising $7.4 million to purchase a 1,900-hectare, eight-island archipelago in northwestern Lake Superior. NCC partnered with The Nature Conservation of the United States and the Ontario and federal governments to acquire […]

Read More

Long Live the King

Long Live the King

Monday October 26, 2009 Posted by Conor Mihell A unique land use partnership north of Sault Ste. Marie has resulted in the long-term protection of one of Ontario’s highest points of land. With its twin peaks rising some 360 metres above the surrounding terrain, King Mountain is the focal point of the Algoma Highlands, a swath of […]

Read More

Blasting Lake Superior

Blasting Lake Superior

Tuesday September 22, 2009 Posted by Conor Mihell Joel Cooper can’t say enough about the big lake that looms just outside the patio doors of his modest year-round home near Wawa, Ontario. “Lake Superior has captured my imagination and dominates my life,” says Cooper, a retired Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources employee who lives on […]

Read More

Saving a spectacular shoreline

Saving a spectacular shoreline

by Conor Mihell A seven-year land-use debate now near conclusion in northern Ontario could result in the world’s longest stretch of protected freshwater coastline. Negotiations between the Partnership for Public Lands (of which Ontario Nature is a member), Ministry of Northern Development and Mines (MNDM) and Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) to finalize the Lake […]

Read More

The eagle rises again

The eagle rises again

Friday August 28, 2009 Posted by: Conor Mihell After more than 35 years of endangered species status, bald eagles living south of the French and Mattawa rivers were downgraded to a species of special concern by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources in mid-August. Jody Allair, a biologist with Bird Studies Canada (BSC) who oversees […]

Read More

Why we can’t save this forest

Why we can’t save this forest

What went wrong with the Environmental Assessment Act? How a law that was meant to protect the environment ended up helping industry.






Read More

A road runs through it

A road runs through it

But shouldn’t. Our parks are supposed to be wilderness sanctuaries, yet the trees are logged, the waterways polluted and the trucks keep rolling through. Ontario Nature lobbied hard for tougher protection. So, will the new Provincial Parks Act really put ecological integrity first? by Conor Mihell At a campsite beneath an 80-metre-high cliff at the […]

Read More

Saving King Mountain

Saving King Mountain

by Conor Mihell Standing tall just north of Sault Ste. Marie, a unique forest ecosystem of sugar maple and yellow birch blankets the slopes of one of Ontario’s highest peaks, the aptly named King Mountain. Despite the presence of several rare plant species in the 1,050 hectares of hillside, the land was unprotected and could […]

Read More

River power for the power-hungry

River power for the power-hungry

by Conor Mihell The Ontario Power Authority (OPA), the province’s electricity planning agency, has set its sights on the Albany River, a wild waterway flowing for 980 kilometres through the boreal region of northwestern Ontario and into James Bay. The OPA is proposing the construction of two generating stations that would be capable of feeding […]

Read More

Better late than never: Contaminated sites to be (finally) cleaned up in the Far North

Better late than never: Contaminated sites to be (finally) cleaned up in the Far North

Wednesday August 5, 2009 Posted by: Conor Mihell The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) has committed to cleaning up Cold War-era Mid-Canada Line (MCL) missile detection sites in the James Bay Lowlands of the province’s Far North – finally (see “Hidden health hazards,” Autumn 2008 issue of ON Nature). The federal Department of National […]

Read More

The greatest lake

The greatest lake

When 10,000 square kilometers of Lake Superior became Canada’s first national marine conservation area, environmentalists and paddlers cheered. But with all the fine print buried in its new status, the world’s largest protected freshwater area remains far more vulnerable than most people realize by Conor Mihell When the hot, late-afternoon sun beats down on Bowman […]

Read More

My Turn: Phil Cotton

My Turn: Phil Cotton

Putting conservation on the map As told to Conor Mihell People call me Uncle Phil. It’s a term of endearment I’ve come to appreciate after four summers of canoeing, portaging and camping with 91 new-found friends in Wabakimi Provincial Park, Ontario’s largest expanse of protected boreal forest.

Read More

Trial and error

Trial and error

By Conor Mihell The legalities surrounding cross-border pollution have always been murky, but legal clarity may be forthcoming as a result of a case now before the courts in Sarnia. The Ontario Superior Court of Justice summoned a Michigan-based energy company to face charges for contaminating the St. Clair River, which flows along the international […]

Read More

The dept. of oil and water: Trees and mining combined in new ministry

The dept. of oil and water: Trees and mining combined in new ministry

Friday July 17, 2009 Posted by: Conor Mihell A late June “mini shuffle” of government portfolios at Queen’s Park could put economic development above environmental concerns in the management of Ontario’s forests. On June 24, Premier Dalton McGuinty announced that control of forest-related issues would be transferred from the Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) to the […]

Read More

Tree follies

Tree follies

by Conor Mihell Following a devastating series of layoffs in northern Ontario’s forest industry triggered by downturns in the U.S. market, the prospect of opening a wood-processing mill in Chapleau that would provide 40 local jobs received widespread and enthusiastic support in the town of 1,700, located northwest of Sudbury.

Read More

Mine Fields

Mine Fields

Ontario’s antiquated legislation allows the mining industry to stake claims almost anywhere and operate without full environmental assessments. Responding to the demands of First Nations and conservation groups like Ontario Nature, Premier Dalton McGuinty promised (again) to overhaul the Mining Act. Will this promise be kept? By Conor Mihell On a sunny, late April day, […]

Read More

Places to grow

Places to grow

Rain gardens soak up stormwater, reduce runoff and are a magnet for wildlife. Bonus: they’re practically maintenance free






Read More

Up in smoke

Up in smoke

by Conor Mihell Over a mere 10-year period, Vale Inco’s Copper Cliff smelter has showered Sudbury with a staggering 674 tonnes of carcinogenic nickel particulates – the equivalent of about 850 pickup truck loads. Now the mining giant is asking for relief from new Ontario Ministry of the Environment (MOE) regulations for air quality, which […]

Read More

Digital magazine notification