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The devil’s in the details

The devil’s in the details

Jon and Leif Nelson’s “A hole in the landscape” [Spring 2006, page 30] describes a trip into Devil’s Crater. The article tells of the authors using a chainsaw to make a portage into Devil’s Crater and of camping for two nights. A review of the trip map posted in the article confirms the authors we […]

Good food gone bad

Good food gone bad

Pretty on the outside, sure, but inside the nutritional content of what we eat is way down If there is any truth to the saying you are what you eat, then a great many of us may be in serious trouble. According to Thomas Pawlick, a science journalist and organic farmer, much of the food […]

Backyard harvest

Backyard harvest

Fresh, tasty produce. Green space. Conserving the soil, water and air. There are lots of great reasons why city farming has become so popular. And you can’t beat the travel time by Allan Britnell On a sweltering Monday morning in late May — by 10 a.m., the thermostat is reading 30ºC — I visit the […]

Autumn 2006

Autumn 2006

By Victoria Foote The province’s record on the boreal forest; urban sprawl plays leapfrog; First Nations ask for mining moratorium. With much patience and fortitude, Kathy Nihei of the Wild Bird Care Centre has nursed countless avian casualties back from the brink. By Moira Farr A guide to Ontario’s rarest trees. By Lorraine Johnson Free workshops for […]

The 3,000-mile salad

The 3,000-mile salad

Southern Ontario contains some of Canada’s most fertile farmland. Why, then, is so much of our food imported? By Linda Pim It used to be that when I ate a salad in winter, it was a long-distance affair. I munched on the “3,000-mile salad” consisting of organic loose-leaf California lettuce that, according to American writer […]

Inside Ontario Nature

Inside Ontario Nature

Leading edge conference The seventh-ever leading edge conference will be held in Burlington, October 4 to 6, 2006. Presented by the Niagara Escarpment Commission, the conference is focused on issues of sustainability, environmental monitoring and biosphere research. “people (attending) can walk away and explore the possibilities of how these interrelated themes can be put into […]

Field Trip: Tree spotting

Field Trip: Tree spotting

A guide to Ontario’s rarest trees By Lorraine Johnson The loneliest tree in all of Ontario must surely have been the redbud found on Pelee Island in 1892 by botanist John Macoun. Growing on the sandy soils of Fish Point, at the south end of Pelee Island, this single specimen was buffeted by wind and […]

What good is nature?

What good is nature?

More than 100 children told us the answer in Ontario Nature’s first writing contest for kids ESSAY CONTEST INTRODUCTION By Caroline Schultz When I was a child, our summers on Ireland’s Atlantic coast were endless days of exploring and rock-pooling. We netted crabs, shrimps and fish and stored them in bucket-sized habitats of seaweed, stones […]

A different kind of crop

A different kind of crop

A new agricultural incentive may be key to saving wildlife habitat: paying farmers not to grow by D’Arcy Jenish Two rows of towering maples line the drive of the Barrie family farm in the municipality of Clarington, 75 kilometres east of Toronto, and at one end is a sign that tells visitors they have arrived […]

The new farm

The new farm

Ontario’s agricultural landscape has gone industrial as big box, high-tech greenhouses, impervious to seasons, weeds and weather, replace field crops. How food grows on… by Ray Ford photography by Evan Dion Outside the fumes from Inco’s superstack blend into an overcast sky, and the restive summer atmosphere is limbering up for a thunderstorm. But here […]