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ON Nature Fall 2009

ON Nature Fall 2009

DEPARTMENTS 5 |  This issue Battling the Bureaucracy The impenetrable environmental assessment process. By Caroline Schultz 8 | Earth Watch New ideas about old-growth forests; kayakers clean up in Georgian Bay; green alternatives to salt; Guelph development encroaches on rare species habitat. On the cover 28 | Urban Nature   Plan Bee In the wake of […]

How to build a bee box

How to build a bee box

by Brad Badelt A backyard bee box can provide a great home for solitary bees to lay their eggs.  Solitary bees – also referred to as “native bees” – differ from honey bees in that every female is fertile, and typically inhabits a nest she constructs herself. Mason orchard bees, the most common solitary bee, […]

Fall 2009

Fall 2009

The impenetrable environmental assessment process. By Caroline Schultz New ideas about old-growth forests; kayakers clean up in Georgian Bay; green alternatives to salt; Guelph development encroaches on rare species habitat. In the wake of the mysterious honeybee die-off, a renaissance in urban beekeeping has blossomed. As keepers attest, worker bees improve biodiversity, pollinate our plants […]

Plan bee

Plan bee

In the wake of the mysterious honeybee die-off, a renaissance in urban beekeeping has blossomed. As keepers attest, worker bees improve biodiversity, pollinate our plants and produce the best honey you’ll ever taste.

Animal parade

Animal parade

Some photographers bait wildlife to get that perfect shot. Is that right? by Moira Farr Last winter, an influx of northern owl species to the Ottawa area brought droves of bird watchers and photographers from all over the province and even the United States, hoping to get glimpses, and photos, of the impressive creatures. To […]

Conservation winners

Conservation winners

In May, Ontario Nature hosted its 78th annual general meeting (AGM) in conjunction with the Huron Fringe Birding Festival at the Bruce County Museum in Southampton. Ontario Nature’s Herpetofaunal Atlas coordinator and resident reptile expert, Joe Crowley, gave a presentation about reptiles at risk in Grey and Bruce Counties that no doubt spiked interest in […]

Acadian flycatcher

Acadian flycatcher

Unchecked deforestation throughout its Central and South American wintering grounds is the single greatest threat to the survival of this diminutive songbird. by Tim Tiner Deep within the largest stands of Ontario’s Carolinian forest, at the buggy bottoms of steep, hemlock-shrouded ravines and the inner reaches of tall-treed swamps, lies the domain of the Acadian […]

Hold the salt

Hold the salt

by Allan Britnell We all know that we should reduce the amount of salt in our diet. But we also need to limit the amount that gets into the environment. Unfortunately, Canadian winters lead to more than five million tonnes of rock salt being dumped on roads, sidewalks and parking lots each year. And while […]

Risky business

Risky business

by Bob Gordon Despite long-standing opposition, the City of Guelph’s Hanlon Creek Business Park (HCBP) will not go away. The city, having annexed 1,489 hectares of land from Puslinch Township in 1993 and having committed 271 of these to the building of what Guelph mayor Karen Farbridge describes on her blog as “a model for […]

Record bird count

Record bird count

by Jim MacInnis In our Spring 2009 issue we introduced you to Kevin Shackleton, Ontario Nature board member and birder extraordinaire. Last May, Kevin participated in the Baillie Birdathon, a fundraising event held annually by Bird Studies Canada (BSC) through which participants earn sponsorship dollars based on the number of birds they spot in a […]

Lost Bay reserve grows

Lost Bay reserve grows

by Mark Carabetta Ontario Nature has recently doubled the size of its Lost Bay Nature Reserve, a moody landscape where you can find a number of at-risk turtle species, eastern ratsnakes and eastern ribbonsnakes. This summer, the organization purchased 58 hectares of adjacent forest and wetland habitat, increasing the size of the Lost Bay reserve […]

New ideas on old growth

New ideas on old growth

by Caroline Schultz It has been more than a decade since old-growth forest conservation took centre stage as a critical conservation issue in Ontario. But it is essential that we look again at why old-growth conservation is an imperative. The challenges of protecting endangered species, such as threatened woodland caribou, and conserving biodiversity are as […]

Another songbird silenced

Another songbird silenced

I really enjoyed “Incredible journeys,” by Bridget Stutchbury [Spring 2009], about our glorious songbirds. It is, however, so sad to read about their loss of habitat and population decline. I live in south Mississauga and today – sadly – I picked up a Blackburnian warbler that had hit our front door glass. I just hate […]

Battling the bureaucracy

Battling the bureaucracy

by Caroline Schultz The lush Ogoki Forest encompasses 10,876 square kilometres of boreal forest in northwestern Ontario and provides superb habitat for woodland caribou, a species at risk that depends on this region for its survival. As Conor Mihell notes in his excellent article (“Why we can’t save this forest”) examining the opaque and, at […]