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Mining messes

Mining messes

I was naturally more than a little upset to read the article “The Ring of Fire” [Autumn 2010, page 18] which discusses the extent to which mining exploration has already begun in the Ring of Fire area in Ontario. If anyone doesn’t know what damage future mining operations can do without adequate environmental controls, please […]

Field work

Field work

By Joe Crowley Ontario Nature conservation staff have now completed two field seasons conducting research on some of the province’s rarest creatures. This summer, in my capacity as coordinator of Ontario Nature’s Reptile and Amphibian Atlas project, I worked with John Urquhart, staff ecologist, collecting data from Pelee Island and Lost Bay Nature Reserve for […]

A royal rebound

A royal rebound

By Allan Britnell With its distinctive black, orange and white-speckled patterning, the monarch (Danaus plexippus) is probably the best known of all North American butterflies. It is also one of the continent’s most well travelled insects, migrating more than 3,000 kilometres from its summer retreats as far east as Newfoundland to its overwintering grounds in […]

The buzz is gone

The buzz is gone

By John Hassell Around the world, researchers have noted with increasing concern the rapid decline in bumblebees, yet another once common creature now at risk of disappearing altogether. The decrease in bumblebee populations is so severe that the Committee on the Status of Species at Risk in Ontario added the first bumblebee, the rusty-patched bumblebee […]

Join the club

Join the club

By Amber Cowie Sometimes, bigger really is better. The borders of the Greenbelt surrounding the Greater Toronto Area continue to extend, allowing additional lands to be incorporated under the Greenbelt Act. This past summer, the City of Guelph asked that more than 800 hectares of important habitat in the Guelph area also come under the […]

Heavy breathing

Heavy breathing

By Sharon Oosthoek The earth’s plants collectively inhale – wait for it –123 billion tonnes of carbon through photosynthesis each year, according to a team of international researchers who say their finding will eventually allow a more accurate prediction of the impact of climate change on trees, shrubs and crops.

Living fences

Living fences

By Allan Britnell That good fences make good neighbours is a commonly held truism, but fences can also be good for the environment, particularly when they are made from trees. In southwestern Ontario, the County of Wellington has initiated a number of innovative programs that incorporate so-called living fences to do everything from boosting crop […]

Power struggles

Power struggles

By Mark Carabetta For the past two years, Ontario Nature has been battling a controversial electrical power plant in King Township, and the fight isn’t over yet. Most recently, the organization is opposing an unprecedented regulation passed by the Ontario government that has created a loophole that permits the power plant to be built, undermines […]

Secret Worlds

Secret Worlds

Intrepid conservation staff poke into the earth’s nooks and crannies in search of salamanders, frogs, turtles and other rarities. Welcome to the making of Ontario Nature’s Reptile and Amphibian Atlas.
By Peter Christie

Honouring Graeme

Honouring Graeme

Once in a while, we receive a donation that humbles us. Ontario Nature recently became the beneficiary of a life insurance policy. (In this form of planned giving, the donor names Ontario Nature as the beneficiary and receives a tax receipt for the premiums paid annually.) The gift is in honour of Graeme Whistance-Smith. Suzanne […]

Winter 2010

Winter 2010

Working together for conservation. By Caroline Schultz Speaking up for nature; citizen science in action; the monarch butterfly makes a royal rebound; Ontario lists its first endangered bumblebee. What may be the last, viable population of the pint-sized wildfowl can be found on Walpole Island.. By Tim Tiner Donor spotlight: honouring Graeme Whistance-Smith. Standing together […]

Northern bobwhite

Northern bobwhite

The grasslands and savannahs of Walpole Island support what may be the last, viable, native population of this pint-sized wildfowl. By Tim Tiner Indigenous to Ontario’s nearly disappeared tallgrass prairie and savannah, the northern bobwhite highlights the plight of many imperilled grassland birds. The pint-sized wildfowl, which in Canada is found only in southwestern Ontario, […]

The power of partnerships

The power of partnerships

By Caroline Schultz Ontario Nature has been in the biodiversity business for almost 80 years. We have had some huge conservation successes through the decades, resulting in permanent protection and lasting change. These successes are not only ours to celebrate, but are often triumphs we share with others – always with our members and donors, […]