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In search of creepy crawlers

In search of creepy crawlers

by James Paterson From Toronto to Thunder Bay, Ontario Nature staff have been travelling across the province in search of snakes, salamanders and other creeping, crawling and slithering wildlife. As part of the Ontario Reptile and Amphibian Atlas project, conservation staff have conducted workshops, presentations and field surveys to increase awareness of and gather data […]

Beetle mania

Beetle mania

by Peter Gorrie After nearly a decade of destruction due to a voracious, invasive insect, a glimmer of hope is stealing into Ontario’s gloomy ash forests. The emerald ash borer has already destroyed most of its host trees in southwestern Ontario, specifically Essex County where this creature entered the province nine years ago. On its own, […]

Climate change economics

Climate change economics

by Peter Rosenbluth Many in the environmental community found that the recent provincial election was as notable for what was not discussed as it was for the points of contention. Absent from most debates was any discussion of conservation in an era of climate change. While candidates crossed swords over, for example, the applicability of […]

Follow the leader

Follow the leader

by Joshua Wise This summer, the Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug (KI) First Nation took a bold stance to protect the Big Trout Lake watershed by ratifying a watershed declaration and consultation protocol aimed at preserving 1.3 million hectares of boreal lakes, rivers, forests and wetlands that form the spiritual, as well as physical, centre of the community.

Carbon credit swap

Carbon credit swap

by Allan Britnell Most of us have known for years that trees are good for the environment, particularly because of their ability to sequester greenhouse gases spewed by cars and the other conveniences of our lives. Yet, until recently, no one knew precisely just how much carbon forests could store. But a detailed analysis published […]

The problem with aggregates

The problem with aggregates

by Caroline Schultz   A strong wind whipped in heavy grey clouds, and the threat of rain was imminent as several hundred shivering people queued up at the edge of a woodlot north of Shelburne at the beginning of a unique demonstration of civil society. They were lining up to protest against the proposed “mega-quarry” […]

Friend or foe?

Friend or foe?

Negotiating with former adversaries comes with a unique set of challenges. by Julee Boan In the early 1970s, a popular bumper sticker read: “If you are cold, hungry and out of work, eat an environmentalist.” At the time, and for many years after, an “us versus them” mentality dominated the discourse between tree huggers and […]

Re-thinking native non-natives

Re-thinking native non-natives

In his letter, “A native non-native” (Autumn 2011, page 7) Don Scallen says that “black locust is not nearly as credible a threat as the other invasive plants featured in [Lorraine Johnson’s] article “Natural invaders” [Spring 2011, page 22].” Those responsible for control of invasive plants have, by necessity, taken the nuanced approach that Scallen […]

The Couchiching Conservancy

The Couchiching Conservancy

“We did not inherit this land from our fathers. We are borrowing it from our children.” In southern Ontario, we have borrowed heavily from our children. The story is well known, if not well heeded: urban sprawl has paved over large tracts of green spaces at an alarming rate. The Couchiching Conservancy has met this […]

Winter 2011

Winter 2011

Can we find a way to make highways green? By Caroline Schultz Peregrine falcons found at Malcolm Bluff Shores; how to nail the perfect picture; on the trail of creeping, crawling and slithering creatures; facing off against the emerald ash borer; a green economy for northern Ontario; First Nations community drafts a landmark watershed declaration. […]

Picture perfect

Picture perfect

by Sharon Oosthoek If a sasquatch were suddenly to walk out of the forest,  you should try to squeeze off a few pictures, jokes nature photographer Robert McCaw. More typically, though, the best images are a result of planning, patience and a solid understanding of the habits of the animal you are trying to photograph.

Residents on our reserve

Residents on our reserve

by Gerard Keledjian It’s confirmed. Nesting peregrine falcons are living on what will soon be Ontario Nature’s newest nature reserve, Malcolm Bluff Shores. The Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) recently verified that a pair of peregrine falcons, which Ontario Nature staff discovered by accident, is nesting in the Midhurst area, the only documented nest in […]