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Letters – RE: “Urban Sprawl Leaps Over T

Letters – RE: “Urban Sprawl Leaps Over The Greenbelt”

Re: “Urban sprawl leaps over the Greenbelt” (Earth Watch, Spring 2016) I have just read “Urban Sprawl Leaps Over The Greenbelt” in the current (Spring 2016) issue of ON Nature. It is alarming. Midhurst is close to Barrie where I live and development is spreading in all directions from what were the boundaries of the […]

Letters – Hay

Letters – Hay

Re: “The cutting edge” (Feature, Spring 2016) With regard to the photo on the title page of the article “Cutting Edge” in the Spring 2016 edition of ON Nature: I am a farmer, and I can recognized good — and bad — haying practices when I see them. The aforementioned photo illustrates a number of […]

Letters – re: Under the Gun

Letters – re: Under the Gun

Re: “Under the gun“, (Feature, Spring 2016) Am writing from Grey Bruce – home of a unique variation on Black Bears – and so read with interest, the piece by Conor re:  Under the Gun. I attempted to find the Ted Talk (2013) that he spoke about toward the end of the article – but […]

Northern Forest Foraging Guide

Northern Forest Foraging Guide

Ontario’s forests, meadows and waters provide an incredible range of nutritious and delicious edible wild plants. Ontario Nature has prepared this foraging guide as an introduction to this local resource, and to encourage people to get outside and experience the wonders the natural world provides.

The trees, shrubs, herbaceous plants and fungi listed in this guide are a sample of some of the abundant local species that can be harvested sustainably, though there are many other wild edibles to explore. The guide is intended to be a starting point for people interested in foraging for edible wild plants and should not be considered to be a definitive resource for their identification and use.


Basic Rules for Harvesting Edible Wild Plants
Sustainable Harvesting
Caution!
Disclaimer
Acknowledgments
Forest Foraging Guide Resources


Trees | Shrubs | Herbaceous Plants | Fungi


Correction – Spring 2015

Correction – Spring 2015

Last Word “Keep our parks Wi-Fi free, ” (page 38, spring 2015). We incorrectly reported that the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry proposed Wi-Fi expansion in provincial parks. In fact, Ontario Parks does not at present have any plans to proceed with Wi-Fi expansion. Paragraph two of the article should read: “It seems Parks Canada […]

Nearby nature reserves

Nearby nature reserves

In her article in the spring 2015 issue of ON Nature, Lorraine Johnson demonstrates how neighbours are creating pollinator habitat and restoring ecological connections in towns, suburbs and cities across the province. She provides the example of Palmerston Square Pollinator Patch – a small but diverse community garden that took root in west Toronto in 2014 […]

The history of herping in Ontario

The history of herping in Ontario

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” Margaret Mead In the spring 2014 issue of ON Nature magazine, Tanya Pulfer wrote an article about 30 years of herp atlassing in Ontario. Limited by the short length of her article, Pulfer […]

Correction

Correction

On page 10 of its Summer 2014 issue, ON Nature published an article entitled “Midhurst residents oppose development”. The article stated that a land developer mentioned in the article, Geranium Corporation, had not returned calls for comment. This was incorrect. In fact, Geranium and its public relations representative did return the reporter’s calls for comment, although through no fault […]

Good news for monarchs

Good news for monarchs

When word spread this spring about the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food’s proposed delisting of milkweed from the Schedule of Noxious Weeds, Ontario Nature supporters sent supportive comments through the Environmental Registry, as did many other nature enthusiasts and scientists. Thankfully, the ministry listened and officially removed milkweed from the noxious weed list in […]

Embrace your inner Grinch!

Embrace your inner Grinch!

  On more than one occasion, by more than one person, I have been referred to as the modern-day Grinch. The original Grinch is the frightfully unhappy antagonist in Dr. Seuss’ 1957 classic How the Grinch Stole Christmas. He despises Christmas and ridicules all the residents of Whoville who celebrate it.

Mucking about in Lost Bay

Mucking about in Lost Bay

Last week, Ontario Nature staff and volunteers were turtle hunting in Lost Bay Nature Reserve in eastern Ontario. Established in 2000 with a generous private land donation, the reserve protects 44 hectares of provincially significant wetlands and mature forest around Lake Gananoque. John Urquhart, conservation science manager, and Megan Anevich, nature reserves intern, who led […]

Fact and fiction

Fact and fiction

In 2007, to much acclaim, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) was passed with support from members of all parties. Just six years later, the Liberals are quietly trying to gut the act, the NDP are muzzled by one or two northern members seeking exemptions for forestry, and the Progressive Conservatives are raging on about how […]

Dragonfly and Damselfly Guide

Black-tipped darner dragonfly
DRAGONFLIES
Canada Darner
Fawn Darner
Green Darner
Lance-tipped Darner
Shadow Darner
Springtime Darner
Dragonhunter
Boreal Snaketail
Dusky Clubtail
Lilypad Clubtail
Arrowhead Spiketail
Common Baskettail
Prince Baskettail
Swift River Cruiser
Eastern Pondhawk
Chalk-fronted Corporal
Dot-tailed Whiteface
Widow Skimmer
Twelve-spotted Skimmer
Blue Dasher
Common Whitetail
White-faced Meadowhawk
Ruby Meadowhawk
Yellow-legged or Autumn Meadowhawk
Black Saddlebags
Eastern Amberwing
Halloween Pennant

DAMSELFLIES

Ebony Jewelwing
River Jewelwing
American Rubyspot
Emerald Spreadwing
Sweetflag Spreadwing
Slender Spreadwing
Lyre-tipped Spreadwing
Blue-fronted Dancer
Variable Dancer
Powdered Dancer
Rainbow Bluet
Tule Bluet
Boreal Bluet
Familiar Bluet
Subarctic Bluet
Marsh Bluet
Stream Bluet
Hagen’s Bluet
Orange Bluet
Eastern Forktail
Sedge Sprite

Eating the forest

Eating the forest

Inspired by Conor Mihell’s article, “The Bountiful Forest” I found a recipe book entitled “The Edible Wild” by Berndt Berglund and Clare E. Bolsby in Ontario Nature’s library. The Edible Wild is both a cookbook and guide to wild plants that you can eat and cook with and which can be found throughout North America, including Ontario and […]

The Whimbrels are coming!

The Whimbrels are coming!

The Whimbrels are coming, but not in the numbers bird lovers used to witness. Scientists are currently analysing data collected by volunteers in order to uncover what’s causing the whimbrels’ numbers to decline. This map tells you more about the migration paths of these long-distance fliers. For more information, please click here.

The Problem with Landfills

The Problem with Landfills

Tuesday, December 14, 2010 By Conor Mihell That the majority of Ontarians don’t have a clue where their garbage ends up after its left at the curb has as much to do with society’s general lack of environmental consciousness as it does the province’s lacklustre waste management regulations. Almost six million tonnes of Ontario waste […]

The way of the dodo

The way of the dodo

Wednesday, December 8, 2010 By Allan Britnell It was fitting that, late in 2010—a 12-month period that the United Nations had dubbed the International Year of Biodiversity—dignitaries gathered in Nagoya, Japan for the 10th meeting of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Unveiled at the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, the CBD’s stated goal […]

Sowing a green legacy

Sowing a green legacy

Friday, September 24, 2010 By Allan Britnell In early October (2010), dignitaries gathered at the Wellington County Museum and Archives [www.wcm.on.ca] in Fergus, Ont. for a ceremonial tree planting. The sugar maple sapling sown that day marked a very auspicious milestone: It was the one-millionth tree to be planted under the County of Wellington’s award-winning Green […]

Big lake warming

Big lake warming

Friday, August 13, 2010 By Conor Mihell In April, Minnesota-based naturalists Kate Crowley and Mike Link began a five-month, 2,575-kilometre walk around Lake Superior. Their goal: to capture an ecological snapshot of the lake’s perimeter in 2010—“baseline” information that will no doubt be a valuable tool in measuring changes over time. To achieve their goal, the […]

Bigger is better

Bigger is better

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 By Allan Britnell It seems we can add smaller birds to the growing list of impacts climate change is already having on the planet’s flora, fauna and habitats. A joint Swiss–U.S. study of nearly half-a-million birds, from more than 100 species, has found that birds are becoming lighter and developing smaller […]

Back on track

Back on track

By Conor Mihell Wednesday, May 12, 2010 A 300-kilometre-long rail line linking the northern Ontario cities of Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie was raised from the dead when provincial and federal budgets in late March promised $30 million for long-needed track upgrades. While the antiquated Huron Central Railway is currently only used for transporting freight, rail activists in […]

Development crushes turtles

Development crushes turtles

Tuesday, March 30, 2010 By Conor Mihell The city of Ottawa is pushing through the completion of a four-kilometre extension of Terry Fox Drive to access areas for new housing developments. If roadwork is finished within a year, $32 million of the $47 million project will be paid for by provincial and federal stimulus funds. […]

Giving Invasives the Cold Shoulder

Giving Invasives the Cold Shoulder

Thursday, February 25, 2010 Thursday, February 25, 2010 Posted By Allan Britnell Barely six months after the official surrender of Japanese forces ended the Second World War, Winston Churchill gave a speech in March 1946 at Westminster College in Missouri where he famously stated that, “an iron curtain has descended across the Continent,” coining a term used ever since […]

Finally: less logging in Algonquin

Finally: less logging in Algonquin

  Wednesday, February 3, 2010 Posted By Conor Mihell The ink is nearly dry on a new forest management plan for Algonquin Provincial Park that will increase the amount of logging-free area in Ontario’s most popular park. In November, the Algonquin Forestry Authority, the Crown consortium responsible for managing and planning logging activities within park boundaries, […]